IELTS READING – account for almost 27 per cent of the world’s energy needs S22GT5

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Account for almost 27 per cent of the world’s energy needs

A.

Coal is expected to continue to account for almost 27 per cent of the world’s energy needs. However, with growing international awareness of pressures on the environment and the need to achieve sustainable development of energy resources, the way in which the resource is extracted, transported and used is critical.

A wide range of pollution control devices and practices is in place at most modern mines and significant resources are spent on rehabilitating mined land. In addition, major research and development programmes are being devoted to lifting efficiencies and reducing emissions of greenhouse gases during coal consumption. Such measures are helping coal to maintain its status as a major supplier of the world’s energy needs.

B.

The coal industry has been targeted by its critics as a significant contributor to the greenhouse effect. However, the greenhouse effect is a natural phenomenon involving the increase in global surface temperature due to the presence of greenhouse gases – water vapour, carbon dioxide, tropospheric ozone, methane and nitrous oxide – in the atmosphere. Without the greenhouse effect, the earth’s average surface temperature would be 33-35 degrees C lower, or -15 degrees C. Life on earth, as we know it today, would not be possible.

There is concern that this natural phenomenon is being altered by a greater build-up of gases from human activity, perhaps giving rise to additional warming and changes in the earth’s climate. This additional build-up and its forecast outcome has been called the enhanced greenhouse effect. Considerable uncertainty exists, however, about the enhanced greenhouse effect, particularly in relation to the extent and timing of any future increases in global temperature.

Greenhouse gases arise from a wide range of sources and their increasing concentration is largely related to the compound effects of increased population, improved living standards and changes in lifestyle. From a current base of 5 billion, the United Nations predicts that the global population may stabilise in the twenty-first century between 8 and 14 billion, with more than 90 per cent of the projected increase taking place in the world’s developing nations. The associated activities to support that growth, particularly to produce the required energy and food, will cause further increases in greenhouse gas emissions. The challenge, therefore, is to attain a sustainable balance between population, economic growth and the environment.

The major greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane and nitrous oxide. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are the only major contributor to the greenhouse effect that does not occur naturally, coming from such sources as refrigeration, plastics and manufacture. Coal’s total contribution to greenhouse gas emissions is thought to be about 18 per cent, with about half of this coming from electricity generation.

 

 

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IELTS READING – THE TOTARA LANGUAGE INSTITUTE NEW ZEALAND S22GT4

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THE TOTARA LANGUAGE INSTITUTE NEW ZEALAND

Study English in a national university with students from many countries.

  • 4-week blocks
  • 5 hours’ tuition each day
  • Examination preparation
  • University entry (with appropriate academic and English requirements)

Choice of accommodation for all students – homestays with local families or in Halls of Residence with New Zealand students.

The Totara Language Institute is part of the University of Waikato in the city of Hamilton, in New Zealand’s North Island. Intensive English classes are taught in four-week blocks throughout the year and students may enrol for as many blocks as they wish. Classes are for 5 hours each day, Monday to Friday, and include preparation for several international English language examinations. All the courses are taught by highly qualified teachers, many of whom also teach on Language Institute graduate programmes in second language teaching and applied linguistics. Classes are small, usually from 10-12 students with a maximum number of 15, and normally contain a mix of students from a wide range of countries. Students who study English at the Language Institute become international members of the Waikato Students’ Union. The option is available to move on to university study if students meet the English language and academic entry levels for their choice of programme. The Language Institute provides student support, welfare and activities services. Students are met at Auckland airport on arrival and accommodation is provided with local families or in University Halls of Residence with New Zealand students.

Hamilton, one of New Zealand’s fastest growing cities, is ideally located for a wide range of leisure and cultural activities. The Waikato river, the longest river in New Zealand, flows through the centre of the city, providing a picturesque and park-like setting of riverside walks and gardens. The Waikato region is a diverse agricultural area, rich in historic sites, arts and crafts, hot springs, native forests, mountains and rivers. Within easy reach is an unspoilt coastline; the wild and rugged west coast beaches famous for surfing, and the more peaceful east coast resorts are only a short drive from Hamilton. Further afield the mountains of the central North Island, 3 hours’ drive away, provide superb ski facilities in winter and hiking country in summer.

The Language Institute activities coordinator can assist students to arrange any sport and leisure activities. Assistance is also available for ongoing travel arrangements for students. Students on a visitor visa or work permit may study for a maximum of 3 months. Courses of longer duration require a student permit which is issued for the length of study only.

 

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IELTS READING – MAIN STREET, GATTON RE-DEVELOPMENT S22GT2

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MAIN STREET, GATTON RE-DEVELOPMENT

ROAD WIDENING TO AFFECT WEEKEND TRAFFIC AND BUS SERVICES TO THE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS

The next stage in the re-development of the roads in the town of Gatton will mean that Main Street will be closed between Little and Denning Streets from 6am on Saturday, 12 August to 6pm on Sunday, 13 August. The intersections of these streets with Main Street will not be affected.

We expect that the work will be completed at this time without further disruption to traffic.

Motorists should note that Main Street will be closed over the weekend during the hours indicated.

No university bus services will operate through the area between Little and Denning Streets. However, alternative services will operate on bus routes 566 and 45 between Gatton Road, the town centre and the university.

The Transport and Roads Department apologises for any inconvenience caused while improvements are in progress.

 

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IELTS READING – ASHWOOD COLLEGE S22GT3

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ASHWOOD COLLEGE

 

ASHWOOD COLLEGE

How to enrol if you ore abroad …

Please complete the Application Form and send this with the correct Non-Returnable Deposit (see below) to: The Overseas Registrar, Ashwood College, 20 Glossop Street, Midhaven. Tel: 01423-968075; Fax: 01423-968076.

 

1. STUDENT SENDS APPLICATION

FORM TO ASHWOOD COLLEGE

WITH DEPOSIT OF £ 100 FOR

COURSE ONLY OR £ 200 FOR

COURSE & ACCOMMODATION

 

2. ASHWOOD COLLEGE

CHECKS AVAILABILITY

OF COURSE AND

ACCOMMODATION

 

3. ASHWOOD COLLEGE

SENDS STUDENT

  • confirmation letter
  • invoice
  • certificate of enrolment
  • Transfer request form

 

4. STUDENT RETURNS

COMPLETED AIRPORT

TRANSFER FORM IF

REQUIRED

 

5. ASHWOOD COLLEGE

CONFIRMS TRANSFER

 

6. STUDENT CONFIRMS

TIME OF ARRIVAL TO

HOST FAMILY OR TO

ASHWOOD COLLEGE

 

7. STUDENT ARRIVES IN

MIDHAVEN AND IS

TESTED. INTERVIEWED

AND PLACED IN CLASS

 

8. STUDENT PAYS ANY

OUTSTANDING

BALANCE FOR

COURSE AND ACCOMMODATION

Deposit/payment:

1. Your enrolment form must be accompanied by the course deposit of £100 or, if you are booking accommodation through the school, your course and accommodation deposit of £200

2. Any balance of course and accommodation fees must be paid in full by the first day of your course.

3. All bank charges incurred in sending money to Ashwood College must be paid by the student.

4. Deposits and payments are non-refundable and non-transferable.

5. A charge of £20 will be made for any changes made to the bookings.

Conditions:

Timetable

Each hour consists of 50 minutes’ tuition and a 10-minute break.

Public and School Holidays

There is no reduction in the fee where a course includes a Public Holiday, except for two weeks at Christmas.

Age

The above centres of Ashwood College do not accept students under 16 years of age.

Attendance

Students are expected to attend regularly and on time. Students forfeit tuition if they arrive late, are absent or leave before the course ends.

Student Holidays:

Students on long courses, except examination preparation courses, may take a holiday of one week every 12 weeks without losing their course fee for this period.

Location and Time of Course:

Ashwood College has two all-year centres and a summer centre in Midhaven. Before entry to the school, students must take an entry test to determine the level of class they enter. We cannot guarantee the time or location of a student’s course although every attempt is made to place students in the centre and at the time of their choice.

 

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IELTS READING – Student Loans S23GT4

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Student Loans

The Government has been funding a loans scheme for students in Higher Education since September 1990.

These loans are available as a ‘top up’ to the standard grant. Although the loan is intended to supplement the grant for living costs, eligibility for a student loan is not restricted to those who receive a maintenance grant.

The decision whether or not to take the loan is yours.

Eligibility

You are eligible for a student loan if you are a UK resident and are attending a full-time Higher Education course, below postgraduate level, or a Postgraduate Certificate in Education course, provided you start your course before your 50th birthday. Full-time courses last at least one academic year and include sandwich courses which combine time at college with time spent in a workplace.

Eligible courses are offered by colleges, universities, the Scottish grant-aided colleges and other publicly funded institutions providing Higher Education courses.

In general, eligible courses include first-degree courses or their equivalents and any other courses for which your Local Authority will pay your tuition fees.

Your financial circumstances

Students who want loans are not ‘means tested’ or ‘credit vetted’- all those eligible will obtain a loan.

This means that:

  • The amount of your maintenance grant or tuition fees does not matter.
  • Other income, if any, is not taken into account.
  • Any previous student loans are not taken into account.
  • The income of your parents, spouse, partner or other relatives is not taken into account.
  • Your previous financial record is not a consideration.

When to apply for a loan

If you would like more information on how to apply for a student loan in readiness for your entry to Higher Education in Autumn 2003, then you should contact The Student Loans Company from June 2003 onwards.

Once in Higher Education, you can apply for a loan at any time in the academic year.

 

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IELTS READING – STUDENT CLUBS AND SOCIETIES S23GT3

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STUDENT CLUBS AND SOCIETIES

Desperate to find friends with common interests?

Urgently in need of student contacts around college?

Looking for different cultural and religious experiences?

Wanting some good discussion?

Don’t look any further!

JOIN A CLUB OR SOCIETY AND HAVE FUN!

A. This club was first started by a group of friends who enjoyed going to the cinema. When our trips became more frequent we realised that there must be others who also shared our love of movies. This club is for those people. Membership gives wide access to other activities like basketball and football as well as barbeques and other social functions. We don’t just enjoy movies.

B. The association has many opportunities to debate and we are a non-political unbiased international organisation which aims to promote international awareness on campus. We establish links and access to the organisation’s agencies and other internationalist organisations and their resources. Our plans this year include discussion groups, guest speakers and to build a model of the UN General Assembly.

C. Whether for fun or debating experience, we discuss everything from personal experience, future society or feminism. This year we plan an internal competition, weekly debates and beginners’ lessons as well as chances to compete nationally. Whether it be to improve your verbal or social skills the society provides both!

D. Want to be a movie star? Then go somewhere else! On the other hand, want to work really hard for great rewards? Then come and join the club where the interesting theatre is created. We usually put on three productions each year. So if you like to write, paint, act, direct or do anything in the theatre, come and put your name down with us.

If you are interested in joining any of these clubs, you can leave a message for the President at the CAS Office in the Student Union Building. And don’t forget the CAS Ball is an annual event! This year it’s being held on 22 December!

 

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IELTS READING – FIRST IMPRESSIONS COUNT S23GT5

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FIRST IMPRESSIONS COUNT

A. Traditionally uniforms were — and for some industries still are — manufactured to protect the worker. When they were first designed, it is also likely that all uniforms made symbolic sense – those for the military, for example, were originally intended to impress and even terrify the enemy; other uniforms denoted a hierarchy – chefs wore white because they worked with flour, but the main chef wore a black hat to show he supervised.

B. The last 30 years, however, have seen an increasing emphasis on their role in projecting the image of an organisation and in uniting the workforce into a homogeneous unit — particularly in ‘customer facing’ industries, and especially in financial services and retailing. From uniforms and workwear has emerged ‘corporate clothing’. “The people you employ are your ambassadors,” says Peter Griffin, managing director of a major retailer in the UK. “What they say, how they look, and how they behave is terribly important.” The result is a new way of looking at corporate workwear. From being a simple means of identifying who is a member of staff, the uniform is emerging as a new channel of marketing communication.

C. Truly effective marketing through visual cues such as uniforms is a subtle art, however. Wittingly or unwittingly, how we look sends all sorts of powerful subliminal messages to other people. Dark colours give an aura of authority while lighter pastel shades suggest approachability. Certain dress style creates a sense of conservatism, others a sense of openness to new ideas. Neatness can suggest efficiency but, if it is overdone, it can spill over and indicate an obsession with power. “If the company is selling quality, then it must have quality uniforms. If it is selling style, its uniforms must be stylish. If it wants to appear innovative, everybody can’t look exactly the same. Subliminally we see all these things,” says Lynn Elvy, a director of image consultants House of Colour.

D. But translating corporate philosophies into the right mix of colour, style, degree of branding and uniformity can be a fraught process. And it is not always successful. According to Company Clothing magazine, there are 1000 companies supplying the workwear and corporate clothing market. Of these, 22 account for 85% of total sales – £380 million in 1994.

 

 

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IELTS READING – Fabulous Furniture S23GT2

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Fabulous Furniture

Section A

Have you ever wanted to buy a small bedside table? Or a dinner table for 20 people? If you want it, we’ve got it! Fabulous Furniture has Australia’s widest choice of furniture.

Section B

If you visit a Fabulous Furniture store, you can have your furniture – right now – using our Fabulous Furniture Credit Card. When you see something you really want, you can have it straight away, and pay later.

Section C

Unlike most cards, the Fabulous Furniture Credit Card offers a full 60-day interest-free period on every Fabulous purchase – no matter when you make your purchase. This leaves you with more money to spend on other things.

Section D

  • You may choose to pay the full amount within 60 days. In this case, you pay no interest.
  • You may spread your payments over a longer period. In this case, interest will be charged after the initial 60-day interest-free period.

Section E

Application is absolutely free! Nor are there any annual fees or administration fees. Just fill in the application form and bring it to your nearest Fabulous Furniture store. Your application will be processed promptly and you can begin making purchases immediately after your application is approved.

Section F

We have stores in every major city, so you’re never far away from a Fabulous Furniture store. For our addresses, just check in your local telephone directory.

 

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IELTS READING – GOOD REASONS FOR CHOOSING  ATLAS ENGLISH LANGUAGE COLLEGE S21GT4

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GOOD REASONS FOR CHOOSING 
ATLAS ENGLISH LANGUAGE COLLEGE

On an English course with Atlas English Language College, you improve your language skills and make friends from all over the world!

A. Because Atlas courses start every Monday of the year, there’s bound to be one that fits in with your academic, personal or professional commitments. Whatever your level of language ability, from beginner to advanced, you can choose to study for any length of time, from two weeks to a full year. Courses match a range of individual requirements, from intensive examination preparation to short summer programmes. Most courses commence at 9 am and run till 3 pm.

21 B. If you take an intensive full-time course, we will help you to select the Special Interest Options which best suit your goals. From then on, our teacher will discuss your work with you on a weekly basis. This means that you should develop the language skills you need and that you are helped to study at your own pace.

22 C. The popularity and success of any language school depend greatly on the quality of the teachers and the methods they employ. All Atlas teachers have specialist qualifications in the teaching of English to foreign students and are all native speakers. We employ only experienced professionals with a proven record of success in the classroom.

23 D. Atlas’s teaching methodology is constantly revised as more is discovered about the process of learning a new language. Our teachers have access to an extensive range of materials, including the very latest in language teaching technology.

24 E. On your first day at school, you will take a test which enables our Director of Studies to place you at the appropriate study level. Your progress will be continuously assessed and, once you have achieved specific linguistic goals, you will move up to a higher level of study.

25 F. Every Atlas course fee includes accommodation in carefully selected homestay families. Breakfast and dinner each day are also included, so you need have no concerns about having to look for somewhere to live once you get to the school.

26 G. On completion of any Intensive, Examination or Summer course, you will receive the Atlas Course Certificate of Attendance. On completion of a four-week course or longer, you will also receive the Atlas Academic Record that reflects your ability in every aspect of the language from conversation to writing. Such a record will allow you to present your linguistic credentials to academic institutions or potential employers around the world.

 

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IELTS READING – ROBOTS AT WORK S21GT5

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ROBOTS AT WORK

27 A. The newspaper production process has come a long way from the old days when the paper was written, edited, typeset and ultimately printed in one building with the journalists working on the upper floors and the printing presses going on the ground floor. These days the editor, subeditors and journalists who put the paper together are likely to find themselves in a totally different building or maybe even in a different city. This is the situation which now prevails in Sydney. The daily paper is compiled at the editorial headquarters, known as the prepress centre, in the heart of the city, but printed far away in the suburbs at the printing centre. Here human beings are in the minority as much of the work is done by automated machines controlled by computers.

28 B. Once the finished newspaper has been created for the next morning’s edition, all the pages are transmitted electronically from the prepress centre to the printing centre. The system of transmission is an update on the sophisticated page facsimile system already in use in many other newspapers. An imagesetter at the printing centre delivers the pages as films. Each page takes less than a minute to produce, although for colour pages four versions, once each for black, cyan, magenta and yellow are sent. The pages are then processed into photographic negatives and the film is used to produce aluminium printing plates ready for the presses.

Example C. Beware of robots

A procession of automated vehicles is busy at the new printing centre where the Sydney Morning Herald is printed each day. With lights flashing and warning horns honking, the robots (to give them their correct name, the LGVs or laser guided vehicles) look for all the world like enthusiastic machines from a science fiction movie, as they follow their own random paths around the plant busily getting on with their jobs. Automation of this kind is now standard in all modern newspaper plants. The robots can detect unauthorised personnel and alert security staff immediately if they find an “intruder” not surprisingly, tall tales are already being told about the machines starting to take on personalities of their own.

29 D. The robots’ principal job, however, is to shift the newsprint (the printing paper) that arrives at the plant in huge reels and emerges at the other end sometime later as newspapers. Once the size of the day’s paper and the publishing order are determined at head office, the information is punched into the computer and the LGVs are programmed to go about their work. The LGVs collect the appropriate size paper reels and take them where they have to go. When the press needs another reel its computer alerts the LGV system. The Sydney LGVs move busily around the press room fulfilling their two key functions to collect reels of newsprint either from the reel stripping stations or from the racked supplies in the newsprint storage area. At the stripping station, the tough wrapping that helps to protect a reel of paper from rough handling is removed. Any damaged paper is peeled off and the reel is then weighed.

 

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IELTS READING – The Discovery of Uranus S20GT5

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The Discovery of Uranus

Someone once put forward an attractive though unlikely theory. Throughout the Earth’s annual revolution around the sun, there is one point of space always hidden from our eyes. This point is the opposite part of the Earth’s orbit, which is always hidden by the sun. Could there be another planet there, essentially similar to our own, but always invisible?

If a space probe today sent back evidence that such a world existed it would cause not much more sensation than Sir William Herschel’s discovery of a new planet, Uranus, in 1781.Herschel was an extraordinary man – no other astronomer has ever covered so vast a field of work – and his career deserves study. He was born in Hanover in Germany in 1738, left the German army in 1757, and arrived in England the same year with no money but quite exceptional music ability. He played the violin and oboe and at one time was organist in the Octagon Chapel in the city of Bath. Herschel’s was an active mind, and deep inside he was conscious that music was not his destiny; he, therefore, read widely in science and the arts, but not until 1772 did he come across a book on astronomy. He was then 34, middle-aged by the standards of the time, but without hesitation he embarked on his new career, financing it by his professional work as a musician. He spent years mastering the art of telescope construction, and even by present-day standards, his instruments are comparable with the best. Serious observation began in 1774. He set himself the astonishing task of ‘reviewing the heavens’, in other words, pointing his telescope to every accessible part of the sky and recording what he saw. The first review was made in 1775; the second, and most momentous, in 1780-81. It was during the latter part of this that he discovered Uranus. Afterwards, supported by the royal grant in recognition of his work, he was able to devote himself entirely to astronomy. His final achievements spread from the sun and moon to remote galaxies (of which he discovered hundreds), and papers flooded from his pen until his death in 1822.

Among these there was one sent to the Royal Society in 1781, entitled An Account of a Comet. In his own words: On Tuesday the 13th of March, between ten and eleven in the evening, while I was examining the small stars in the neighbourhood of H Geminorum, I perceived one that appeared visibly larger than the rest; being struck with its uncommon magnitude, I compared it to H Geminorum and the small star in the quartile between Auriga and Gemini, and finding it to be much larger than either of them, suspected it to be a comet.

 

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IELTS READING – PAPER RECYCLING S19GT5

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PAPER RECYCLING

A. Paper is different from other waste produce because it comes from a sustainable resource: trees. Unlike the minerals and oil used to make plastics and metals, trees are replaceable. Paper is also biodegradable, so it does not pose as much threat to the environment when it is discarded. While 45 out of every 100 tonnes of wood fibre used to make paper in Australia comes from waste paper, the rest comes directly from virgin fibre from forests and plantations. By world standards, this is a good performance since the worldwide average is 33 percent waste paper. Governments have encouraged waste paper collection and sorting schemes and at the same time, the paper industry has responded by developing new recycling technologies that have paved the way for even greater utilization of used fibre. As a result, industry’s use of recycled fibres is expected to increase at twice the rate of virgin fibre over the coming years.

B. Already, waste paper constitutes 70% of paper used for packaging and advances in the technology required to remove ink from the paper have allowed a higher recycled content in newsprint and writing paper. To achieve the benefits of recycling, the community must also contribute. We need to accept a change in the quality of paper products; for example, stationery may be less white and of a rougher texture. There also needs to support from the community for waste paper collection programs. Not only do we need to make the paper available to collectors but it also needs to be separated into different types and sorted from contaminants such as staples, paperclips, string and other miscellaneous items.

C. There are technical limitations to the amount of paper which can be recycled and some paper products cannot be collected for re-use. These include paper in the form of books and permanent records, photographic paper and paper which is badly contaminated. The four most common sources of paper for recycling are factories and retail stores which gather large amounts of packaging material in which goods are delivered, also offices which have unwanted business documents and computer output, paper converters and printers and lastly households which discard newspapers and packaging material. The paper manufacturer pays a price for the paper and may also incur the collection cost.

 

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IELTS READING – The Medicine S23GT1

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The Medicine

  • This medicine must be taken as directed.
  • Before using, shake the bottle.
  • Dose: 50 ml to be taken twice daily after the midday and evening meals.

Instructions:

  • Do not take this medicine on an empty stomach or immediately before lying down.
  • If any of the following occur, discontinue taking the medicine and contact your doctor: dizziness, vomiting, blurred vision.
  • This medicine is not available without a prescription and is not suitable for children under 5 years.
  • Once you have begun to take this medicine you must continue to take it until the bottle is empty, unless advised otherwise by your doctor.
  • Only one course of this medicine should be taken in a period of six months.
  • Expiry date: 16 February 2004.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: PRODUCT RETURN

Fancy Foods wishes to inform the public that pieces of metal have been found in some Jars of Fancy Foods Chicken Curry (Spicy). The batches of the jars involved have numbers from J6617 to J6624. The batch number Is printed on the bottom of each Jar.

If you have any Jars with these batch numbers, please return them (preferably unopened) to the supermarket where you purchased them. You can also return them to the factory (Fancy Foods Retailers, Blacktown). Fancy Foods will pay $10 for each jar returned unopened and $5 for each Jar already opened.

No payment will be made for empty jars, which do not need to be returned. However, the company’s Retailing Manager will be interested to hear from people who have consumed chicken curry from any of the above batch numbers. In particular, it will be helpful if they can give information about the place of purchase of the product.

Jars of Fancy Foods Chicken Curry (Coconut) and Fancy Foods Chicken Curry (Mango) have not been affected and do not need to be returned.

REWARD

Fancy Foods will pay a reward of $10,000 to $50,000 for information which leads to the con-viction of any person found guilty of placing metal pieces in its products. If you have such infor­mation, please Contact the Customer Relations Manager, Fancy Foods Retailers, Blacktown.

 

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IELTS READING – INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS HOUSE S19GT4

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS HOUSE

International Students House is a unique club and accommodation centre for British and overseas students in London. It is located in the heart of London’s West End and is close to all public transport facilities

ACCOMMODATION

» comfortable accommodation for up to 450 people in single, twin, 3/4 bedded and multi-bedded rooms » 44 self-contained flats for married students and families. » long and short stays welcomed.

MEMBERSHIP

Club membership is open to all full-time students, professional trainees, student nurses and au pairs. Membership costs are kept to an absolute minimum to enable the widest possible access. You can join for as little as one month and for up to one year at a time. Membership entitles you to use the various facilities of the House. It has:

– restaurants 

– student bars and coffee shop 

– study rooms 

– clubs and societies 

– aerobics and fitness training 

– discos, dance, jazz and cinema 

– travel and excursions and much more !

The best way to check out all we have on offer is to drop in any Tuesday evening between 7.15 pm and 8.30 pm for Open House in the Club Room. This is an opportunity for you to meet the staff and other club members, enjoy a free cup of coffee and find out all about what’s going on. You can take advantage of special membership offers. (Useful tip: bring along 3 passport size photographs if you wish to take out membership.)

ADVICE SERVICE

Thanks to the support of STA Travel and in association with LCOS (the London Conference on Overseas Students) International Students House now provides the service of an International Students Adviser. This new welfare service is open to all students at London’s bona-fide academic institutions. It aims to provide welfare support to help students overcome any personal or practical difficulties they may be experiencing whilst studying in Britain. One of the key features of the Advice Service is that the Adviser can be seen during the evenings until about 8 pm, Monday to Thursday.

 

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IELTS READING – International Language Centre INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY S22GT1

IELTS SIMULATOR ONLINE GENERAL TRAINING READING – International Language Centre INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY S22GT1 COMPUTER DELIVERED ONLINE IELTS SIMULATION
IELTS READING

International Language Centre INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

A. International Language Centre

INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

FRENCH JAPANESE

SUMMER INTENSIVE

Also commencing January 1997

* Mandarin * Cantonese * Thai

    * Vietnamese * Korean * Indonesian * English 

      * Spanish * Italian * German * Russian

              For further details contact:

Admissions & Information Office 5 Bligh Street, 

                   Sth. Sydney, 2000

                     Tel: 295 4561

                     Fax: 235 4714

 

B. Global Language Learning Centre

ONE OF THE WORLD’S BEST LANGUAGE SCHOOLS IS 

                               NOW IN SYDNEY

                      LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE

                             IN 10 – 20 WEEKS

                            LATEST METHODS

                   DAY AND EVENING COURSES

                        BUSINESS, HOSPITALITY

                                  OR TRAVEL

                    CHOICE OF 9 LANGUAGES

                       Phone for Appointment

                                938 0977

 

C. DO YOU WANT TO LEARN ENGLISH SOMEWHERE DIFFERENT 

Then come to Perth, the Picturesque Capitol City of Western Australia

Situated on the beautiful Swan River, Perth offers you . . .

  • Mediterranean climate
  • lovely Indian Ocean beaches
  • every sport imaginable
  • multicultural society
  • government owned TAFE Colleges
  • high standards of facilities and staff
  • maximum flexibility
  • hostel or homesray accommodation

Intensive English Courses Available

  • 5 intakes per year
  • 10 week modules
  • multicultural classes
  • optional programs
  • Cost: $2000 AUD per 10 weeks

Study Tours Available

  • English/cultural/tourism

For further details, contact :

TAFE International,

Level 5, 1 Mill Street,

Perth 6000, Western Australia

Telephone: 619 320 3777

 

D.   French SUMMER COURSES

                         January 1997

     Adults’ Crash Course 9-19 Jan

              Intensive 3 or 4 hrs a day,

          morning or evening 30 hrs $250

      (Beginners and Low Intermediate only)

   Adults’ Normal Course 9 Jan-4 March

        10 levels from Beginner to Advanced

     Twice a week – 2 hrs morning or evening

  Once a week, Saturday 9am – 1.30pm 32hrs $278 

     High School Crash Course 11-25 Jan

          Intensive 3 hrs a day, 1pm – 4pm

              Years 8 to 12 24hrs $200

          Starts Wednesday 11.1.97

                Club Francais

27 Claire St, Sydney, Phone 227 1746

 

 E.          UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA

         Learn English in Australia’s National Capital

  • The TESOL Centre has more than 24 years’ experience in providing quality language programs for overseas students
  • Test preparation, possibility of further academic study
  • Access to University facilities
  • Classes conducted on campus with opportunity to mix with Australian students

 

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IELTS READING – PERSONAL COMPUTERS AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC TO USE S21GT3

IELTS SIMULATOR ONLINE GERENAL TRAINING READING – PERSONAL COMPUTERS AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC TO USE S21GT3 FREE COMPUTER DELIVERED ONLINE IELTS SIMULATION

IELTS READING

PERSONAL COMPUTERS AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC TO USE

  • 2 personal computers are available, for a fee of $5.00. There is also an ink jet printer attached to each terminal. The library has a number of commercially available programs for word processing and spreadsheets.
  • A4 paper can be bought from the desk if you wish to print your work. Alternatively, you can bring your own paper. If you wish to store information, however, you will need to bring your own floppy disk.

Bookings

Because of high demand, a maximum of one hour’s use per person per day is permitted. Bookings may be made up to three days in advance. Bookings may be made in person at the information desk or by phoning 8673 8901 during normal office hours. If for some reason you cannot keep your appointment, please telephone. If the library is not notified and you are 15 minutes late, your time can be given to someone else. Please sign in the visitors’ book at the information desk when you first arrive to use the computer.

Please note that staff are not available to train people or give a lot of detailed instruction on how to use the programs. Prior knowledge is, therefore, necessary. However, tutorial groups are available for some of the programs and classes are offered on a regular basis. Please see the loans desk for more information about our computer courses.

 

Attempt full reading test…